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Date & Time

  • February 14th 16:00 UTC/GMT - 11:00 EST

Dial-in

We will use the international conference call dial-in. Please follow directions below.

  • U.S.A/Canada toll free: 866-740-1260, participant code: 2257295
  • International toll free: http://www.readytalk.com/intl 
    • Use the above link and input 2257295 and the country you are calling from to get your country's toll-free dial in #
    • Once on the call, enter participant code 2257295

Agenda

Discuss and review COAR's 12 user stories that outline priority functionalities for next generation repositories.

The document, to which you can provide public comments directly, is available here: nextgenrepo.coar-repositories.org

Deadline for comments is March 3rd 2017, so we should attempt to combine and send in our feedback before our next DCAT meeting. Comments are submitted through http://comment.coar-repositories.org/

Preparing for the call

If you can, read or review the document in advance, which will help the discussion.

Meeting notes

COAR (Confederation of Open Access repositories) started off as a European project. Originally initiated by institutions from movements like OpenAIRE and to link Open Access repositories in Europe, COAR grew out to a full Open Access organization.

On their 'Next Generation Repositories' website, the organization presents several statements and user stories, which are elaborated upon below. In the early stages of DSpace 7 development these statements and topics can make us focus and refocus on the direction we are currently going.

First of all, COAR stated 4 principles:

  • Distribution of control: Control on publishing currently lies mainly in hands of the major publishers. This control should be distributed more evenly.
  • Inclusiveness: Every institution should be able to join, regardless of their internal resources .
  • Public good: the technologies used should be open for everyone.
  • Intelligent openness: As many resources as possible should be made openly available.

Next to these principles COAR also stated 5 design assumptions:

  • Focus on the resources themselves, not just associated metadata: treat files equally to the their metadata.
  • Pragmatism: use widely spread and adopted technologies.
  • Evolution, not revolution: build upon existing technologies where possible.
  • Convention over configuration: adopt widely recognized conventions and encourage users to adopt them where possible.
  • Engage with users where they are: Integrate with existing environment and systems in which users are already engaged.

Next to these principles and design assumptions, COAR stated 12 user stories.

1. Discovering metadata that describes a scholarly resource

See full user story

"As a human or machine user, I want to easily and uniformly identify the metadata in a repository record, so that I can ascertain the relevance of the resource."

DSpace is currently not exposing any metadata in the urls as it is using handle. But it does include google scholar head tags to facilitate the indexing of content by google scholar. One downside is that although we are doing a thorough job on this, we are only doing it ad hoc for google Scholar. It would be good if we could implement a more broadly accepted standard to make metadata tags machine readable more broadly.

2. Discovering the identifier of a scholarly resource

See full user story

"Web reference managers, annotation tools, or crawlers that encounter a landing page or any other web resource that is part of a scholarly object need to easily identify the associated persistent HTTP URI for the resource, so that they can retrieve it"

Usually URI's refer to metadata records, but persistent URI's to files should be easily visible as well according to this principle. DSpace makes bitstream URL's harder to retrieve on purpose, as those are more subject to change compared to metadata pages.

Despite these efforts, Google often indexes direct links to bitstreams. As these links often break it may be better to make a more persistent link to bitstream, or to entirely stop disposing links to bitstreams. This latter option may also avoid people referring to the bitstream instead of the item page when referring to certain content.

3. Discovering usage rights

See full user story

"As a machine or human user, I need to easily and uniformly identify the licensing and re-use conditions of a scholarly resource, so that I know what I am allowed to do with it."

DSpace is currently not exposing any license or re-use information to the end-users. This is something which can be improved in future versions of DSpace. 

4. Recognizing the user

See full user story

"As a user, I want my repository to recognize me and other users so that I can be connected with other users who I know, leave comments and be informed of content that is of interest to me."

User stories 4 and 5 are related to each other, we cover them both in this section.

Commenting and annotating could work for some platforms, but it is questionable if this is a good idea for DSpace as well. The question is if we want to expand repository functionality to this level. Such functionality also requires us to be able to identify the user, as an anonymous comment could easily go wrong. An identification through ORCID could be a solution to this problem.

Although we would like to avoid commenting and annotating in DSpace itself, we must acknowledge the large interest in open peer review.

5. Commenting, annotating, and peer-review

See full user story

See the user story 4 notes.

6. Automated recommender systems for repositories

See full user story

This user story was not addressed during the meeting. In case you are willing to share any insight, experience or idea, feel free to do so in the comments below.

7. Providing a social notification feed

See full user story

This user story was not addressed during the meeting. In case you are willing to share any insight, experience or idea, feel free to do so in the comments below.

8. Resource syncing and notification

See full user story

This user story was not addressed during the meeting. In case you are willing to share any insight, experience or idea, feel free to do so in the comments below.

9. Data mining

See full user story

This user story was not addressed during the meeting. In case you are willing to share any insight, experience or idea, feel free to do so in the comments below.

10. Supporting researchers’ workflows

See full user story

This user story was not addressed during the meeting. In case you are willing to share any insight, experience or idea, feel free to do so in the comments below.

11. Comparing usage

See full user story

This user story was not addressed during the meeting. In case you are willing to share any insight, experience or idea, feel free to do so in the comments below.

12. Preservation

See full user story

This user story was not addressed during the meeting. In case you are willing to share any insight, experience or idea, feel free to do so in the comments below.

2017 DCAT meeting topics

Last time, following topics were proposed:

  • How are different institutions using crosswalks in DSpace?
  • what is happening with harvested content, and how do people use it?
  • ORCID
  • DSpace training: how can new DSpace users get acquainted with DSpace development or administration, and how can experienced users improve their skills?

To be determined what we cover in the next meetings.

Call Attendees

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2 Comments

  1. Hi guys, Sarah here from Queen Mary in London, I am listening in but my mic is playing up so you can't hear me.  It's really overcast here in London today (smile)

    1. It's crisp and sunny here in the mountains of Montana.