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  1. Create the webapp directory (you may use any name you want):
    mkdir [dspace]/webapps/jython/
    Tip: The location [dspace]/webapps/jython/ is used just to illustrate that the jython webapp is just another webapp like other DSpace webapps. It's possible to choose a different location - in fact, it's preferable because the [dspace]/webapps/ directory is replaced every time you run "ant update" (the old webapps directory will not be deleted, it will be renamed to "webapps-[timestamp]").
  2. Download the latest Jython installer jar (e.g. jython-installer-2.7.0.jar) from http://www.jython.org/downloads.html
  3. Get jython.jar and the Lib directory.
    1. either unzip the installer jar:
      unzip -d [dspace]/lib/ jython-installer-2.7.0.jar jython.jar 'Lib/*'
      unzip -d [dspace]/webapps/jython/WEB-INF/lib/ jython-installer-2.7.0.jar jython.jar jar 'Lib/*'
    2. or use it to install Jython: 
      java -jar jython-installer-2.7.0.jar --console
      Note: Installation location doesn't matter, this is not necessary for DSpace. You can safely delete it after you retrieve jython.jar and Lib
  4. Associate .py files with Jython's PyServlet

    Code Block
    languagexml
    title\[dspace\]/webapps/jython/WEB-INF/web.xml
    <web-app>
        <servlet>
            <servlet-name>PyServlet</servlet-name>
            <servlet-class>org.python.util.PyServlet</servlet-class>
            <load-on-startup>1</load-on-startup>
        </servlet>
        <servlet-mapping>
            <servlet-name>PyServlet</servlet-name>
            <url-pattern>*.py</url-pattern>
        </servlet-mapping>
    </web-app>

     

  5. Create a Hello World servlet:

    Code Block
    languagepy
    title\[dspace\]/webapps/jython/hello.py
    # -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
    from javax.servlet.http import HttpServlet
    
    
    class hello(HttpServlet):
        def doGet(self, request, response):
            self.doPost(request, response)
    
        def doPost(self, request, response):
            toClient = response.getWriter()
            toClient.println('Hello World!')

    Access to DSpace classes from Jython

  6. Copy DSpace jars to the jython webapp's lib directory:
    cp -r [dspace]/lib/* [dspace]/webapps/jython/WEB-INF/lib/
  7. Start up DSpace kernel on webapp startup and point it to your DSpace configuration:

    Code Block
    languagexml
    title\[dspace\]/webapps/jython/WEB-INF/web.xml
    <web-app>
        ...
        <!-- DSpace Configuration Information -->
        <context-param>
            <param-name>dspace-config</param-name>
            <param-value>/dspace/config/dspace.cfg</param-value>
        </context-param>
        <!-- new ConfigurationService initialization for dspace.dir -->
        <context-param>
            <description>The location of the main DSpace configuration file</description>
            <param-name>dspace.dir</param-name>
            <param-value>/dspace</param-value>
        </context-param>
        <listener>
            <listener-class>org.dspace.app.util.DSpaceContextListener</listener-class>
        </listener>
        <listener>
            <listener-class>org.dspace.servicemanager.servlet.DSpaceKernelServletContextListener</listener-class>
        </listener>
    </web-app>


  8. Define the context in Tomcat's configuration. There are several ways how you can do that, so just use the same way you use for configuring DSpace contexts. The recommended one is to use a context fragment:

    Code Block
    languagexml
    titlesudo vim /etc/tomcat7/Catalina/localhost/jython.xml
    <Context docBase="/dspace/webapps/jython" reloadable="true" cachingAllowed="false" />

    A few seconds after you save the file, Tomcat will notice it and load the "jython" context.

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