Page tree

Current Release

This documentation covers the current version of Fedora. Looking for another version? See all documentation.

Skip to end of metadata
Go to start of metadata

Core Features

  • Page:
    Authorization — Fedora 4 authorization is designed to be fine grained, while at the same time manageable by administrators and end users. Authentication is managed by the servlet container or externally, but authorization mechanisms are open to extension and many reference implementations are included. Roles-based access control is an included feature that makes permissions more manageable and at the same time easier for external applications to retrieve, index and enforce. Finer grained security checks have no impact on the performance of requests that have a Fedora administrator role.
  • Page:
    Authorization — Fedora 4 authorization is designed to be fine grained, while at the same time manageable by administrators and end users. Authentication is managed by the servlet container or externally, but authorization mechanisms are open to extension and many reference implementations are included. Roles-based access control is an included feature that makes permissions more manageable and at the same time easier for external applications to retrieve, index and enforce. Finer grained security checks have no impact on the performance of requests that have a Fedora administrator role.
  • Page:
    Authorization — Fedora 4 authorization is designed to be fine grained, while at the same time manageable by administrators and end users. Authentication is managed by the servlet container or externally, but authorization mechanisms are open to extension and many reference implementations are included. Roles-based access control is an included feature that makes permissions more manageable and at the same time easier for external applications to retrieve, index and enforce. Finer grained security checks have no impact on the performance of requests that have a Fedora administrator role.
  • Page:
  • Page:
  • Page:
  • Page:
  • Page:
  • Page:
  • Page:
    RESTful HTTP API — The Fedora 4 HTTP API is generally a RESTful API. HTTP methods like GET, PUT, POST and DELETE are implemented on most resource paths. The API also relies heavily on content negotiation to deliver context-appropriate responses, and a HATEOAS-driven text/html response (providing a decent GUI experience on top of the repository).
  • Page:
    RESTful HTTP API — The Fedora 4 HTTP API is generally a RESTful API. HTTP methods like GET, PUT, POST and DELETE are implemented on most resource paths. The API also relies heavily on content negotiation to deliver context-appropriate responses, and a HATEOAS-driven text/html response (providing a decent GUI experience on top of the repository).
  • Page:
    RESTful HTTP API — The Fedora 4 HTTP API is generally a RESTful API. HTTP methods like GET, PUT, POST and DELETE are implemented on most resource paths. The API also relies heavily on content negotiation to deliver context-appropriate responses, and a HATEOAS-driven text/html response (providing a decent GUI experience on top of the repository).
  • Page:
    Transactions — Fedora 4 supports the ability to wrap multiple REST API calls into a single transaction that can be committed or rolled back as an atomic operation.
  • Page:
    Transactions

    Fedora 4 supports the ability to wrap multiple REST API calls into a single transaction that can be committed or rolled back as an atomic operation.

  • Page:
    Transactions

    Fedora 4 supports the ability to wrap multiple REST API calls into a single transaction that can be committed or rolled back as an atomic operation.

Optional Features

  • Page:
    Backup and Restore — The Fedora 4 Backup capability allows a user, such as the repository manager, make a REST call to have the repository binaries and metadata exported to the local file system. Inversely, the Restore capability allows a user to make a REST call to have the repository restored from the contents of a previous Backup operation. In addition, with the default configuration, files are stored on disk named according to their SHA1 digest, so a filesystem backup approach can also be used.
  • Page:
    Backup and Restore — The Fedora 4 Backup capability allows a user, such as the repository manager, make a REST call to have the repository binaries and metadata exported to the local file system. Inversely, the Restore capability allows a user to make a REST call to have the repository restored from the contents of a previous Backup operation. In addition, with the default configuration, files are stored on disk named according to their SHA1 digest, so a filesystem backup approach can also be used.
  • Page:
    Backup and Restore — The Fedora 4 Backup capability allows a user, such as the repository manager, make a REST call to have the repository binaries and metadata exported to the local file system. Inversely, the Restore capability allows a user to make a REST call to have the repository restored from the contents of a previous Backup operation. In addition, with the default configuration, files are stored on disk named according to their SHA1 digest, so a filesystem backup approach can also be used.
  • Page:
    External Search — To support the differing needs for sophisticated, rich searching, Fedora 4 comes with a standard mechanism and integration point for indexing content in an external service.  This could be a general search service such as Apache Solr or a standalone triplestore such as Fuseki or Blazegraph
  • Page:
    External Search

    To support the differing needs for sophisticated, rich searching, Fedora 4 comes with a standard mechanism and integration point for indexing content in an external service.  This could be a general search service such as Apache Solr or a standalone triplestore such as Fuseki or Blazegraph

  • Page:
    External Search

    To support the differing needs for sophisticated, rich searching, Fedora 4 comes with a standard mechanism and integration point for indexing content in an external service.  This could be a general search service such as Apache Solr or a standalone triplestore such as Fuseki or Blazegraph

Supplementary Information

  • Page:
    External Content — When referencing content hosted outside of the repository, you can create an empty binary to act as a placeholder for the external content, specifying the URL of the external content.
  • Page:
    External Content — When referencing content hosted outside of the repository, you can create an empty binary to act as a placeholder for the external content, specifying the URL of the external content.
  • Page:
    External Content — When referencing content hosted outside of the repository, you can create an empty binary to act as a placeholder for the external content, specifying the URL of the external content.
  • Page:
    Identifiers — Identifiers can be specified in REST API calls and generated either automatically using the internal PID minter or via an external REST service.
  • Page:
    Identifiers — Identifiers can be specified in REST API calls and generated either automatically using the internal PID minter or via an external REST service.
  • Page:
    Identifiers — Identifiers can be specified in REST API calls and generated either automatically using the internal PID minter or via an external REST service.
  • Page:
    Linked Data Platform The W3C Linked Data Platform (LDP) specification describes a set of best practices and simple approach for a read-write Linked Data architecture, based on HTTP access to web resources that describe their state using the RDF data model. Fedora 4 implements the LDP specification for create, read, update and delete (CRUD) operations, allowing HTTP, REST, and linked data clients to make requests to Fedora 4.
  • Page:
  • Page:

  • No labels